Sunday, 27 September 2015

Tutorial: FPW Prussian Jägers

It's been a long time since I've done a tutorial on here, so I thought I'd share a step-by-step on painting a Prussian Jäger of the Franco-Prussian War.

It's mainly up here for passing interest, since most readers are already accomplished painters, but also serves as a useful reference for me in case I want to paint the same models in years to come.  Also, perhaps it will serve as a detailed example of my painting style, which usually runs like this:

  • White undercoat
  • Flat colours
  • Army painter wash
  • Flat colours again as a highlight
  • Detail and ligher colours for final highlight
I'd be interested to hear people's thoughts on this method; I've been thinking a lot about other painting methods and techniques ever since I saw some of Dai's lovely RPG figures.

1.  The figure (a Foundry model) is superglued to a 2p coin and then undercoated with a white spraypaint.


2.  The tunic is painted Dark Green (I used Citadel Dark Angels Green)

3.  The trousers and hands are painted a light grey (gloves are optional - they were issued to NCOs and soldiers but not always worn in action)

4.  The shako, rifle barrel, webbing, blanket and boots are painted black

5.  The rifle stock is painted a dark brown

6.  The face is given a flesh colour

7.  The cuffs, tunic piping, epaulettes and collar are painted red, and the breadbag Bleached Bone.

8.  Rifle banding and shako badge are painted gold (I also clean up any mistakes at this stage, like the gloves and shako strap which I'd missed)

9.  A generous brown wash is given - I use Soft Tone Army Painter

10.  Detail - all the areas are re-highlighted in their original colour, and gun metal is used on the barrel.

And there we have it.  It's quite time-intensive - the model above took about 20 mins including drying time.  If I'm working in batches of three I can do this in 45 mins, as I work on one while the other dries.

Next time I'll finish this chap off with some basing, but for now, what are your thoughts?  How does this differ from your own techniques?  Any areas for improvement?

Ed

11 comments:

  1. I've found I get more impressive contrasts by using lighter base colours and much darker washes - a base of Rakarth Flesh washed in the GW Flesh-shade, for example, gets a lovely skin tone that brings out the details on the model really easily.

    Also, for batch painting, don't under-estimate drybrushing - and experiment with doing it before and after washing - you get very different results with each which look excellent and don't take much time to do.

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    1. I used to use dark and black washes, but I found it gave such a blotchy result that I often ended up re-highlighting and lost half the effect. I agree that GW inks are good, they used to be my staple but I think AP ones are smoother.

      You're also dead right with batch painting and drybrushing - I just don't do very much batch painting any more...

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  2. I like it
    It's basically my method for 15's but without the rehighlighting. I also undercoat/basecoat in the predominant colour of the figure I'm painting. So for this figure I would probably have under coated in grey as green over grey is better than grey over green.

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  3. I like it
    It's basically my method for 15's but without the rehighlighting. I also undercoat/basecoat in the predominant colour of the figure I'm painting. So for this figure I would probably have under coated in grey as green over grey is better than grey over green.

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    Replies
    1. Sean, that's an interesting thought on the undercoats. I've only ever tried it once (on my WW1 Russians), but I seem to remember it worked quite well. I'll give it another try and report my results!

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  4. Replies
    1. He did, they are grey gloves is all. :)

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  5. Those Napoleonic Uniforms are time intensive for sure. Merely one reason I haven't taken the plunge into Napoleonic gaming (again).

    I like your method, very straight forward and quick. I must admit I get too stuck on washes and highlights and detail. What I paint takes far more time than it should.

    Thanks for the props mate!

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    Replies
    1. Thanks mate! Yes, I do spend a long time on them but I only have four of these to paint (it's for a skirmish game). Having said that once all the stages are done sequentially it can be quite efficient - I try to limit myself to base-wash-highlight stages on every model I do, to keep it simple and consistent.

      Well the highlighting especially is something I really admire on your models so it's time well spent!

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