Friday, 21 April 2017

Team Yankee: Homemade Air Power Counters

Afternoon everyone,

Time for (yet another) new project.  I have a habit of starting more things than I finish, but I've decided not to let it worry me unduly.  I not just paint what makes me happy, and if I 'finish' a project, then it's a bonus.

One of those is Team Yankee, the 15mm game from Battlefront Miniatures, much more well-known for their Flames of War series of games.  I'm a recent convert to the scale and time period, being much more interested in 1600 - 1914 and usually in smaller scales.  I was intimidated by the gargantuan size of the FoW rulebook, which brought back painful memories of tedious games of 40K's newer editions, which seemed to consist entirely of looking up obscure situations in rulebooks.

However, I was assured that all that had changed with the Team Yankee rules, which were a forerunner for the new 4th Edition of FoW.  Basically, things had been simplified and players are now provided with a series of snazzy laminated unit cards, which make dice rolling much easier.  I'm currently working on a Polish force - of which more in a future post.

But for today, I wanted to talk about the depiction of air power in games.  Team Yankee, like lots of other games, have players roll a 4+ to bring on air assets.  If they succeed, an expensive model plane is placed on the board, its shooting is resolved, then the model is removed.  Seems a bit pointless.

Motivated by a desire to make my Polish force as cheap as possible, I started toying with the idea of a 'strategic map', where off-table assets like air power (and artillery) can be represented using counters instead of on-table models.

So, with the help of Tumbling Dice's excellent range of Cold War-era aircraft, some 2mm armoured vehicles from Irregular, and an old Soviet map of Hamburg, we did it.

This is the 'board' - a sort of secondary game that's fought alongside the Team Yankee battle.  If ground attack planes can swoop down over whatever grid square the battle is being fought in, it can make an attack run on the board.

Thursday, 6 April 2017

Line of Battle: Rules for Large Battles 1600 - 1914

They're always closer than you think.
Today I unveil a project I've been working on for several years: Line of Battle.  This is a universal set of wargaming rules for large scale line battles between 1600 and 1914, and I'll be putting them up for sale from today.  Read on for details about the game, as well as how to get a free copy for yourself!

What is Line of Battle?

It's a set of rules for historical wargames that we have developed over the last three years.  The concept was inspired by other big-battle rules, like Warmaster and Give Them The Cold Steel, and it has been developed from a set of house rules and amendments to become a completely unique rules system.  Almost every 2mm or 6mm game you have seen on this blog since 2015 has probably been one iteration or another of Line of Battle.

What are the key features?

The game is designed to be moderately complex; a balance between playability and realism.  The key mechanics all fit on two sides of A4, and the rest of the rulebook is devoted to explanations, examples and other historical tidbits.